A Tolkien Virgin

A Tolkien Virgin: The Return of the King – Book VI – Chapter 9 – The Journey ENDS!

“When it’s all said and done, I find myself staring at the last words on the last page in silence, awash in emotion, wondering ‘how can it end?’…”

A Tolkien Virgin
A Tolkien Virgin: The Return of the King – Book V – Chapter 1 – The Journey Continues

A Tolkien Virgin: The Return of the King – Book V – Chapter 1 – The Journey Continues

"Later when Pippin and Gandalf are alone again, Pippin sees something else in Gandalf that I found profound, 'under all there was a great joy: a fountain of mirth enough to set a kingdom laughing, were it to gush forth.' That is an amazing thing to perceive given the immediate situation. What is the source of that fountain?"

A Tolkien Virgin
A Tolkien Virgin: The Two Towers – Book IV – Chapter 8 – The Journey Continues

A Tolkien Virgin: The Two Towers – Book IV – Chapter 8 – The Journey Continues

"Sam also talks about Beren's quest for a Silmaril from Melkor's crown. It's profound that they realize that they're in the same story as the Silmarillion. Although, given Tolkien's different writing styles for the Silmarillion and the Hobbit/Lord of the Rings, Sam and Frodo's peril seems greater to me than Beren's. We can feel their peril more tangibly given the narrative we've been following..."

A Tolkien Virgin
A Tolkien Virgin: The Two Towers – Book IV – Chapter 6 – The Journey Continues

A Tolkien Virgin: The Two Towers – Book IV – Chapter 6 – The Journey Continues

"As the story goes I see now how it's good that Gollum is still around to help guide Frodo, but I say again that if Bilbo had just killed Gollum outright there would be no need for Gollum now to help (and no, you don't need to remind me of what Gandalf said to Frodo when he wished Bilbo had killed him)."

A Tolkien Virgin
A Tolkien Virgin: The Two Towers – Book IV – Chapter 5 – The Journey Continues

A Tolkien Virgin: The Two Towers – Book IV – Chapter 5 – The Journey Continues

"And I'm glad I read the Silmarillion first (minus Of the Third Age), because certain references (although fewer than I'd hoped) are clearer and bring deeper meaning to the present story. A perfect example is Faramir's passing reference to the White Tree--it brings alive the long broken history from the beginnings of time through the fall of Númenor and into Middle-earth."