NewsWire: I Feared The Killer Orcs - The Daily Record

<!--±4041|right|"Playing Pippin again was just like saying hello to an old friend."±--></i>Lord of the Rings<i> star Billy Boyd reveals how he thought he was going to die during the filming of the second movie.

Here are some excerpts from Rick Fulton's interview.</i>


In the next installment, <i>The Two Towers</i>, Billy's character Pippin has to undergo terrible tortures at the hands of the Uruk-Hai and Orcs.

And the actor admits it was all too realistic for his liking. He says: "It was a horrible experience. I even feared for my life in one scene.

"The Orcs have costumes made of spikes and they were throwing me and Dom (Dominic Monaghan, who plays Merry) around. I was close to getting speared by an Orc and was thinking to myself ... `that would be a strange way to go'.

"But I was lucky. In the first film I was bitten on the backside by a horse, but this time I managed to remain unscathed."

At the beginning of the summer, Billy, who will be 34 on Wednesday, returned to New Zealand to shoot new scenes. He spent three weeks filming and doing overdubs for old footage where his speech had been drowned out by special effects or electric fans.

In the first film, Billy's Pippin Took was the clown - but cinema-goers will see a very different Pippin in <i>The Two Towers</i>.

Billy says: "It's a very dark story and it's important to have some sort of release for the audience. Pippin became the focus for this in the first film - he was the sort of character who, when they were in danger, would have a bath.

"But in <i>The Two Towers</i>, he begins to grow up and realises his naivete causes problems. What was charming in the Shire, like stealing cabbages, can get people killed."

The title of the new film has caused some concern in America. At the beginning of the year, an online petition urged director Peter Jackson to rename the film because of the September 11 attacks on the Twin Towers in New York.

But <i>The Two Towers</i> was first published in 1954 by JRR Tolkien and Billy reckons Jackson was right to stand firm. He says: "The books were written nearly 50 years before the atrocities. We shouldn't allow terrorists to affect stories that have been told for years."

<i>Thanks to "Feline" for bringing this interview to our attention.


To read more, please click on the link below.</i>



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